5 Careers for a Master’s in Health Sciences Graduate

5 Health Science Careers for Master’s Degree Graduates

  • Nursing Home Administrator
  • Clinical Management
  • Project Manager
  • Occupational Health
  • Informatics

A master’s degree in health sciences gives you many career options. You can work as a health administrator at a hospital or nursing home. You might pursue public health options and work as a community educator or environmental health specialist. No matter your interests, the high level of specialization available with this degree can help you achieve your goals.

Resource: Top 10 Master’s in Health Sciences Programs Online

1. Nursing Home Administrator

Do you want to help senior citizens live healthier, more enjoyable lives? A role in nursing home administration can be very fulfilling. You’ll supervise clinical staff to ensure residents receive the best possible care. You’ll also set long-term policies for the facility, like whether to allow pets or how much experience nurses need before becoming supervisors. This is a good role if you enjoy blending business operations, employee management and occasional contact with patients.

2. Clinical Management

Do you already have a bachelor’s degree in a clinical science? If you’re a registered nurse, sonographer, respiratory therapist or other allied health provider, you should consider the Master’s in Health Sciences to boost your job options. You’ll be a better candidate for supervisory or management roles with a graduate degree. Unlike a master’s degree in business with a focus on healthcare administration, the M.S. in Health Science focuses completely on health-related topics. You can take a few graduate-level courses to expand your clinical knowledge and scope while also learning business skills.

3. Project Manager

There are many roads to a job as a health project manager with a government or non-profit agency. You can earn a master’s degree in public health (MPH), non-profit management or business administration (MBA). However, if you want a clinically oriented role, consider a science-based degree. You might work as a clinical coordinator for a blood bank, program supervisor for a research trial, or case manager for patients with cancer. You’ll combine your extensive training with on-the-job knowledge of patient care and cutting-edge science.

4. Occupational Health

More and more businesses are realizing the importance of occupational health and safety experts. In this role, you might help a Fortune 500 company choose workplace equipment that will minimize long-term injuries. You could work for a city or state government to ensure compliance with environmental laws. The average wage for an occupational health and safety specialist was over $71,000 in 2017, according to the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. With a graduate degree, you’ll qualify for specialist and management positions, making it easier to earn above average compensation.

5. Informatics

One of the fastest-growing fields in the health industry is informatics. With the switch to electronic medical records and increasing amounts of data used in medicine, someone has to organize the information systems and keep them running. That someone could be you. By choosing a health informatics specialization for your graduate degree, you’ll learn new software and data management techniques. Combined with your previous experience and education in the clinical fields, you’ll be a competitive applicant at any hospital or health organization you want to work for.

Some graduate programs, like a degree in medicine or law, lead to narrow employment options. The beauty of the Master’s in Health Sciences programs is that they can lead to almost any career you could imagine.